The sum of the whole is greater than it's parts and we use some mighty fine parts for these sauces!

We make no claims that our sauces will cure or prevent any disease.  Aside from it being illegal to do so, with so many people making claims, many of which are partially or wholly unfounded or at best misguided.  The purpose of this section is to better help you understand our ingredients, why we choose them and to hopefully inspire you to pursue knowledge as it pertains to your personal health and well being.

Turmeric

(Wikipedia) In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric has been used to treat a variety of internal disorders, such as indigestion, throat infections, common colds or liver ailments, as well as topically to cleanse wounds or treat skin sores.

Basic research shows extracts from turmeric may have antifungal and antibacterial properties.

Turmeric is under study for its potential to affect human diseases, including kidney and cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, cancer, irritable bowel disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and other clinical disorders. 

Burdock Root

(Wikipedia) Folk herbalists considered dried burdock to be a diuretic, diaphoretic, and a blood purifying agent.

Burdock is a traditional medicinal herb used for many ailments. Modern studies indicate that burdock root oil extract is rich in phytosterols and essential fatty acids (including rare long-chain EFAs).

Hops

Hops are also used in herbal medicine in a way similar to valerian, as a treatment for anxiety, restlessness, and insomnia. A pillow filled with hops is a popular folk remedy for sleeplessness, and animal research has shown a sedative effect. 

The relaxing effect of hops may be due, in part, to the specific degradation product from alpha acids, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, as demonstrated from nighttime consumption of non-alcoholic beer (or our hop sauces!). 

2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol is structurally similar to tert-amyl alcohol which was historically used as an anesthetic. How about that.

Hops are of interest for hormone replacement therapy and are under basic research for potential relief of menstruation-related problems.

In preliminary veterinary research, hops compounds are under study for potential activity against pasture-associated laminitis in horses.

Chili Peppers

Capsaicin is considered a safe and effective topical analgesic agent in the management of arthritis pain, herpes zoster-related pain, diabetic neuropathy, mastectomy pain, and headaches.  A 2015 cohort study in China found that eating foods containing chili peppers at least twice a week led to a 10 percent reduced mortality rate all else being equal and eating foods containing chili peppers 6 to 7 days a week had a 14 percent relative risk reduction in total mortality; there was an inverse correlation between eating fresh chilies and diabetes not found in remainder of the cohort.

Red chilies contain large amounts of vitamin C and small amounts of carotene (provitamin A). Yellow and especially green chilies (which are essentially unripe fruit) contain a considerably lower amount of both substances. In addition, peppers are a good source of most B vitamins, and vitamin B6 in particular. They are very high in potassium, magnesium, and iron. Their very high vitamin C content can also substantially increase the uptake of non-heme iron from other ingredients in a meal, such as beans and grains.

A very large study published by the British Medical Journal found some indications that humans who consume spicy foods, especially fresh chili peppers, were less likely to die of cancer or diabetes.

Frankincense

(Wikipedia) In a study, an enriched extract of "Indian Frankincense" (usually Boswellia serrata) was used in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study of patients with osteoarthritis. Patients receiving the extract showed significant improvement in their arthritis in as little as seven days. The compound caused no major adverse effects and, according to the study authors, is safe for human consumption and long-term use.

In a study published in 2009, it was reported that "Frankincense oil appears to distinguish cancerous from normal bladder cells and suppress cancer cell viability."

A 2012 study in healthy volunteers determined that exposure to 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA), a lead boswellic acid in the novel solubilized frankincense extract Boswelan, is increased when taken with food. However, simulations based on a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with single first-order absorption phase proposed that the observed food interaction loses its relevance for the simulated repeated-dose scenario.  We aren't exactly sure what this means, but left here just in case you do.

In a 2012 study, researchers found that the "behavioral effect [of insensole actetate] was concomitant to reduced serum corticosterone levels, dose-dependent down-regulation of corticotropin releasing factor and up-regulation of brain derived neurotrophic factor transcripts IV and VI expression in the hippocampus. These data suggest that IA modulates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and influences hippocampal gene expression, leading to beneficial behavioral effects supporting its potential as a novel treatment of depressive-like disorders." This means it could make you feel better if you are prone to feeling down.

When coupled with Myrrh, below, it becomes a super immune boosting agent.

Myrrh

In pharmacy, myrrh is used as an antiseptic in mouthwashes, gargles, and toothpastes.  Myrrh is currently used in some liniments and healing salves that may be applied to abrasions and other minor skin ailments. Myrrh has also been recommended as an analgesic for toothaches and can be used in liniment for bruises, aches, and sprains.

Myrrh is a common ingredient of tooth powders. Myrrh and borax in tincture can be used as a mouth-wash. A compound tincture, or horse tincture, using myrrh is used in veterinary practice for healing wounds. Meetiga, the trade-name of Arabian Myrrh, is more brittle and gummy than that of the Somalian variety and does not have the latter's white markings. Liquid Myrrh, or Stacte, spoken of by Pliny, also an ingredient of Jewish holy incense, was formerly obtainable and greatly valued but cannot now be identified in today's markets. Myrrh gum is used for indigestion, ulcers, colds, cough, asthma, lung congestion, arthritis pain, and cancer.

"As part of a larger search for anticancer compounds from plants, the researchers obtained extracts from a particular species of myrrh plant (Commiphora myrrha) and tested it against a human breast tumor cell line (MCF-7) known to be resistant to anticancer drugs. Research data indicated that the extract killed all of the cancer cells in laboratory dishes.".

In traditional Chinese medicine, myrrh is classified as bitter and spicy, with a neutral temperature. It is said to have special efficacy on the heart, liver, and spleen meridians as well as "blood-moving" powers to purge stagnant blood from the uterus. It is therefore recommended for rheumatic, arthritic, and circulatory problems, and for amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, menopause, and uterine tumors.

Myrrh's uses are similar to those of frankincense, with which it is often combined in decoctions, liniments and incense. When used in concert, myrrh is "blood-moving" while frankincense moves the Qi, making it more useful for arthritic conditions.

Myrrh is used in Ayurveda and Unani medicine, which ascribe tonic and rejuvenative properties to the resin. It (daindhava) is utilized in many specially processed rasayana formulas in Ayurveda. However, non-rasayana myrrh is contraindicated when kidney dysfunction or stomach pain is apparent or for women who are pregnant or have excessive uterine bleeding.

A related species, called guggul in Ayurvedic medicine, is considered one of the best substances for the treatment of circulatory problems, nervous system disorders and rheumatic complaints.

(Wikipedia) In an attempt to determine the cause of its effectiveness, researchers examined the individual ingredients of a herbal formula used traditionally by Kuwaiti diabetics to lower blood glucose. Myrrh and aloe gums effectively improved glucose tolerance in both normal and diabetic rats.

Myrrh was shown to produce analgesic effects on mice which were subjected to pain. Researchers at the University of Florence showed that sesquiterpenes furanoeudesma-1,3-diene and curzarene in the myrrh affect opioid receptors in the mouse's brain which influence pain perception.

Myrrh has been shown to lower LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) levels as well as to increase the HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) in various tests on humans done in the past few decades. A 2009 laboratory test showed this same effect on albino rats.

In studies done on mice, myrrh has been shown to have significant inhibiting effects on certain types of cancer. The active constituents of myrrh accredited with this property are sesquiterpenes. These tests were done using the myrrh species Commiphora molmol and were also found to inhibit tumor growth.

Ashwaganda

Damiana

Chia Seed

Black Sesame Seed

He Sho Wu/Fo ti

Used primarily, to our knowledge, as an anti aging remedy and a tonic.  Anything that is "anti-aging" usually has some pretty potent libidinous effects  which is why we use it in our Love Potion.

Kava/Ava

Cacao - Chocolate in its beginning form.